Postdoctoral Community Leads the Academic Sectors by Candidly Marking 2018’s UN World Science and Peace Observance—‘Subsoil Hydro-Toxification’ Found as The Grimmest Threat to Human Life

Under the aegis of UNESCO, an assortment of institutional hubs of the world have designated diverse assemblies of inter-disciplinary academicians from different institutions incorporated their vision to address the key-issues concerning the role of science and development in building up peace and ensuring to safeguard a safe, secure and prosperous human life on the planet.

UN Observances//Postdoc/–11/11/2018/

The United Nations has designated November 10 as “World Science Day for Peace and Development”. Proclaimed in 2001 by the UN’s Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) the set-aside day is meant to highlight the significant role of science in society and the need to engage the wider public in debates on emerging scientific issues. It is observed worldwide annually with a different theme pertinent to its conceptual roots. It encompasses all the activities within the scopes of showing the general public the relevance of science in their lives and to engage them in discussions concerning the challenges faced by the science, developments and the societies.

The Association of Science–Technology Centers co-hosted with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) a worldwide conversation about “Science, a Human Right.”

A panel of experts gathered at the AAAS headquarters in Washington, DC and in four science centers around the world: Parque Explora, Medellin (Colombia); We the Curious, Bristol (UK); Continium, Kerkrade (The Netherlands) and Cosmocaixa, Barcelona (Spain).

The conversation proceeded in two parts; the first part, moderated by Jessica Wyndham, Director of the AAAS Scientific Responsibility, Human Rights and Law Program, feature Margaret Weigers Vitullo, Ph.D., Deputy Director of the American Sociological Association, who unpacked what the right to science means based on empirical work involving the scientific and engineering communities, and Shirley Malcom, Ph.D., head of the AAAS Education and Human Resources Programs placed the right to science in the context of the sustainable development goals.

The second part, moderated by Cristin Dorgelo, the President and CEO of ASTC, tackled the role of science centers in communication and implementation of the right to science.

https://www.aaas.org/events/world-science-day-peace-and-development

In the Asian and Oceanic regions, the conjoint postdoctoral observance of the WSDP was marked by Asia-Oceania Post-Doctoral Academia (AOPDA) and SAIRI Postdoc Multiversity for the United Nation SDGs studies, under the patronage of Justice (R) Dr. S.S. Paru, Chancellor Emeritus of SAARC-ASEAN Postdoc Academia.

High profiled academicians from diverse disciplines incorporated their vision to address the key challenges faced by the today’s human life on earth in order to safeguard a safe, secure and prosperous human life in the ever-worsening existing scenarios.

Hazardous toxification occurrences of under-ground water reserves due to the prevailing sewage-drainage practice were declared as the grimmest threat to the human life upon earth, biosafety and the ecological sustainability as well. A Pakistani female Hydro-toxicologist and water conservation expert, Professor Dr. Khalida Khan was titled as thePostdoc Strategic Researcher of the Year’ 2018-2019 by a resolution adopted during the annual proceedings of National Postdoctoral Appreciation Week (NPAW-2018).

https://www.nationalpostdoc.org/page/2018NPAW#AO

The African Academy of Sciences (AAS) and partners celebrated the UN’s WSDPD-2018 by awarding seven inaugural early career African researchers with an AESA-RISE postdoctoral fellowship having a 3 years postdoctoral funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York (CCNY).

The seven researchers were drawn from Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda with some fellows based in institutions outside their home countries, such as the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa and the University of eSwatini.

https://www.exchange.co.tz/international-science-day-marked-in-africa-with-improvement-of-access-to-science-education/

The Director-General of UNESCO, Audrey Azoulay has expressed in the statement for 2018’s WDSPD that UNESCO calls on governments, businesses, civil society and scientists to fully embrace the values of responsible and ethical science, by fully implementing the UNESCO recommendation on science and scientific researchers.

https://en.unesco.org/commemorations/worldscienceday#statements

Princess Sumaya launched the 2018 WSDPD at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris.

In her opening remarks, the Princess reiterated the importance of fulfilling and enabling the human right to science, as outlined in the Universal Declaration for Human Rights of 1948.

In the declaration’s 70th anniversary year, she said it was time to “refocus our efforts on enabling science within all societies” and on “ensuring that all people around the world may share the benefits of scientific engagement and knowledge”.

https://www.msn.com/en-ae/news/other/princess-sumaya-launches-world-science-day-for-peace-and-development-in-paris/ar-BBPBsBz

Dr. Spencer Onu, the Director, Centre for Satellite Technology Development (CSTD) said that science and technology were the keys to developing any nation.

https://uncova.com/world-science-day-scientists-call-for-research-infrastructure-development

Pakistani Scientists Make Gigantic Breakthrough in Space Sciences—Experimentation during the Century’s Longest Lunar Eclipse Marks Paradigm Shifts in Cosmological Understandings.

KARACHI, 28/07/2018// Breaking News Feature/ — The biggest total lunar eclipse of the 21st century has occurred yester-night.

During the longest manifestation of natural phenomenon, which extended over 102 minutes and 57 seconds, a gigantic academic and scientific contribution for the advancement of space sciences and cosmological studies has been made by Pak scientists alongside the laterally coastal area of the Indian Ocean’s purlieu-zone in Karachi.

Pakistani inter-disciplinary researchers have made a historic breakthrough of demonstrating the first direct method of measuring the ‘Cyclotron Radius in the Milieu-circumstance of Hydrogen’, which has been termed as ‘Hydro-Cyclotron Radius’ (HCR), by the P.I. of the cross-disciplinary scientists’ team carrying out the first ever experimentation on corresponding connections and causal relationship  between that the lunar magnetic flux can have on the Hydrogen element.

The cross-disciplinary panel of Pakistani scientists observing and demonstrating the first ever ‘Hydro-Cyclotron Radius’ extent, includes;

Prof. Dr. Zafar Saeed Saify (Ph. D., D. Sc.) Former VC: University of Karachi, Senior Scientist: HEJ.

Prof. Dr. Jawed Iqbal (Ph. D.) Director: Institute of Space and Planetary Astrophysics.

Prof. Dr. Umar Farooq (Ph. D.) Former VC: D.U.H.S.

Prof. Dr. Qadhi Aurangzeb Al Hafi (Ph. D., D. Sc.) P.I.: SAARC Postdoc Academia

Prof. Dr. Ashraf Ch. (Ph. D.) Representative: Royal Society of Chemistry England.

Prof. Dr. Khalida M. Khan (Ph. D.) Former UNESCO Chair at PU.

The team was led by the fabled multidisciplinary scientist of Pakistan, Prof. Dr. Aurangzeb Hafi, who is currently serving as P.I. of various post-doctoral research projects in several universities of Asia.

To date, notably, the world’s leading platforms including NASA have not claimed yet the Cyclotron Radius measurements in Umbral and Penumbral referent-frames so far.

“Besides the HCR measurements, during the course of celestial observations and cosmological findings, the phenomenon of Magneto-Hydro-Tropism (MHT) was clearly and affirmably evidenced as per the scientific parameters.” stated the scientists carrying out the research task during the century’s longest eclipse’s occurrence on 27th-28th July 2018.

“The ever first demonstration of measuring the ‘Hydro-cyclotron Radius’, and evidential endorsement of the phenomenon of Magneto-Hydro-Tropism (MHT) would broaden the prospects for achieving results to enhance the cosmological understandings as well as exploring the far-impacting avenues that would mark paradigm shifts in academic perspectives and scientific contexts”, learnt the panel as affirmed by Prof. Dr. Zafar Saeed Saify, former VC of the Karachi University.

The event has fetched Pakistan’s ‘leading-edge image’ at an international level.

UN issues ‘High Risk Alert’ for Rohingya Children, outlines urgent action to save lives—Rohingya crisis

20 October 2017 – Issuing a dire warning on the desperate situation of Rohingya refugee children, who now number more than 320,000 in Bangladesh, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has called for an end to the atrocities targeting civilians in Myanmar’s Rakhine state, and immediate and unfettered access to all children affected by the violence there.

At present, UNICEF has no access to Rohingya children in northern Rakhine state, where horrific violence since late August has driven over half a million members of the minority Muslim community to seek refuge across the border in Bangladesh.

“Many Rohingya refugee children in Bangladesh have witnessed atrocities in Myanmar no child should ever see, and all have suffered tremendous loss,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake, releasing a new report Outcast and Desperate: Rohingya refugee children face a perilous future.

“This crisis is stealing their childhoods. We must not let it steal their futures at the same time.”

In the report, UNICEF has called for urgent action in four key areas:

  1. International support and funding for the Bangladesh Humanitarian Response Plan and humanitarian response plan for Myanmar;
  2. Protection of Rohingya children and families, and immediate unfettered humanitarian access to all children affected by the violence in Rakhine State;
  3. Support for the safe, voluntary and dignified return of Rohingya refugees to Myanmar; and
  4. A long-term solution to the crisis, including implementation of the recommendations of the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State.

The most pressing need for thousands of refugees and refugee children is food, safe water, sanitation and vaccinations. Psychosocial support, education and counselling is also urgently needed.

Meanwhile, the influx of refugees continues unabated – between 1,200 and 1,800 children are arriving per day (about 60 per cent the total number) and thousands more are said to be on way.

To cope with the crisis, UN relief agencies are working at full tilt, but funding and resources are in short supply.

Ahead of an international pledging conference on 23 October in Geneva, UNICEF has urged donors to respond promptly to the requirements of the updated Bangladesh Humanitarian Response Plan released jointly by the UN and humanitarian agencies.

The Plan calls for $434 million, including some $76.1 million to address the immediate needs of newly-arrived Rohingya children, as well as those who arrived before the recent influx, and children from vulnerable host communities.

The ministerial-level conference, organized by the UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), International Organization for Migration (IOM) and Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and co-hosted by the European Union and Kuwait, will provide Governments an opportunity to show their solidarity and share the burden and responsibility.

More than 700,000 over-one-year-olds vaccinated in massive campaign

In the midst of a crisis which appears to overwhelm any response, UN agencies successfully concluded the first phase of a massive oral cholera vaccine (OCV) campaign, reaching over 700,000 children and people over the age of one with protection against the deadly diarrheal disease.

“The coverage is commendable as the oral cholera vaccination campaign was planned and rolled out against very tight timelines,” said Dr. N. Paranietharan, the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) presence in Bangladesh.

Among the 700,487 people inoculated since the campaign was launched on 10 October, 179,848 are children aged between one and five.

“[The campaign] demonstrates the commitment of the Government of Bangladesh, partners on the ground, as well as partners such as GAVI (a public–private global health partnership) and the International Coordinating Group on vaccine provision, to help secure the health and wellbeing of these immensely vulnerable people,” added the WHO official.

The second phase is scheduled for early November to give an additional OCV dose to children aged between one and five years, for added protection.

The vaccination campaign supplements other preventive measures, such as increased access to safe water, adequate sanitation and good hygiene. To help improve hygiene, a bar of soap was also handed out to each individual administered the vaccine.

Courtesy: The United Nations

For more details:

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=57931#.WexrgjJx3IU